Debugging on the Hardware-Software Boundary with Salami
William McGrath, Jeremy Warner, Daniel Drew, David Mellis, Bjoern Hartmann

Citation
William McGrath, Jeremy Warner, Daniel Drew, David Mellis, Bjoern Hartmann. "Debugging on the Hardware-Software Boundary with Salami". Talk or presentation, 26, October, 2016.

Abstract
Novice-friendly embedded programming pla4orms such as Arduino have allowed countless people to begin with embedded programming and electronic design. These platforms help hide some of the development complexity compared to expert toolchains. However, debugging projects based on embedded processors can be confusing, frustrating, and time-consuming. We believe that these difficulAes arise due to the fact that much of the state of such systems is invisible to the user by default and difficult and tedious to examine. Developers may ask themselves "Why didn't the system respond to a changed input?", "Are the signals changing appropriately?", or even "Did I just accidentally irreversibly damage a part?". However, small microcontrollers do not have a wealth of output bandwidth and developers oJen resort to blinking LEDs or prinAng out messages at key junctures, but this approach is slow, someAmes difficult to interpret, and not scalable.

Electronic downloads


Internal. This publication has been marked by the author for TerraSwarm-only distribution, so electronic downloads are not available without logging in.
Citation formats  
  • HTML
    William McGrath, Jeremy Warner, Daniel Drew, David Mellis,
    Bjoern Hartmann. <a
    href="http://www.terraswarm.org/pubs/872.html"
    ><i>Debugging on the Hardware-Software Boundary
    with Salami</i></a>, Talk or presentation,  26,
    October, 2016.
  • Plain text
    William McGrath, Jeremy Warner, Daniel Drew, David Mellis,
    Bjoern Hartmann. "Debugging on the Hardware-Software
    Boundary with Salami". Talk or presentation,  26,
    October, 2016.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{McGrathWarnerDrewMellisHartmann16_DebuggingOnHardwareSoftwareBoundaryWithSalami,
        author = {William McGrath and Jeremy Warner and Daniel Drew
                  and David Mellis and Bjoern Hartmann},
        title = {Debugging on the Hardware-Software Boundary with
                  Salami},
        day = {26},
        month = {October},
        year = {2016},
        abstract = {Novice-friendly embedded programming pla4orms such
                  as Arduino have allowed countless people to begin
                  with embedded programming and electronic design.
                  These platforms help hide some of the development
                  complexity compared to expert toolchains. However,
                  debugging projects based on embedded processors
                  can be confusing, frustrating, and time-consuming.
                  We believe that these difficulAes arise due to the
                  fact that much of the state of such systems is
                  invisible to the user by default and difficult and
                  tedious to examine. Developers may ask themselves
                  "Why didn't the system respond to a changed
                  input?", "Are the signals changing
                  appropriately?", or even "Did I just accidentally
                  irreversibly damage a part?". However, small
                  microcontrollers do not have a wealth of output
                  bandwidth and developers oJen resort to blinking
                  LEDs or prinAng out messages at key junctures, but
                  this approach is slow, someAmes difficult to
                  interpret, and not scalable.},
        URL = {http://terraswarm.org/pubs/872.html}
    }
    

Posted by David Mellis on 28 Oct 2016.
Groups: pw
For additional information, see the Publications FAQ or contact webmaster at terraswarm org.

Notice: This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright.